Officials evaluating impact of storms on toxic landfill

Rensselaer County

NASSAU, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The Environmental Protection Agency is testing streams near a Rensselaer County landfill for possible contamination following recent flooding from recent storms.

Officials are concerned about the 46,000 tons of industrial waste sitting underneath the Dewey Loeffel Landfill in Nassau. The landfill is considered a Superfund Site.

“Our initial concerns were confirmed unfortunately that there was a significant amount of damage done,” said Town of Nassau Supervisor Dave Fleming.  

Fleming said he’s hoping the storm diluted PCBs from the landfill rather than levels of contamination spiking. This is the latest saga in a long-fought battle to clean up chemicals from the leaking dump.  

“We know people who have died. We know people who have been impacted. It’s long enough. They really need to speed up the process and get this done, but I understand the federal superfund priority list. We may not be on top of the list,” Fleming said.

The runoff from the Little Thunder Creek next to the landfill runs into the Valatie Kill.

“My concern right now is that we are going to have other areas in the Capital Region that are going to have contamination,” Fleming said.  

Residents along the Kill should contact the EPA if sediments have washed onto their property. They have until July 30 to arrange for testing.  

“The only way you’re going to address the situation is to completely excavate the site,” Fleming said.  

The town supervisor said that’s the only recourse because a situation like this will most likely happen again.   

“It may not have been done locally, but I don’t think we have a choice here,” Fleming said. 

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