FORT HUNTER, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation announced Thursday that construction has begun on a $1.7 million project to stabilize the historic Erie Canal Aqueduct at Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site in Montgomery County. The beloved Erie Canal Heritage Corridor landmark has been around since 1841.

“We are thrilled to be able to undertake this important project and preserve this engineering landmark for the enjoyment of all New Yorkers,” said State Parks Commissioner Erik Kulleseid. “This stabilization project will ensure that the aqueduct remains a world-class destination for visitors, while also honoring the ingenuity and hard work of the New Yorkers who built it over 180 years ago. The aqueduct is a component of one of our most visible parks within the Erie Canal National Heritage Corridor and tells the story of New York’s role in the expansion of our nation.”

The stabilization project will involve extensive repairs to the aqueduct’s foundation and structure, as well as the installation of new interpretive signage to educate visitors about the site’s history. The aqueduct, which once carried the Erie Canal over the Schoharie Creek, is among the oldest remaining original structures of the canal.

“The Erie Canal Aqueduct at Schoharie Crossing is an invaluable piece of the historic Canal that helped to build the New York we have today, and the Canal Corporation is grateful to Governor Hochul for her continued dedication to the preservation of our shared history,” said New York State Canal Corporation Director Brian U. Stratton. “This stabilization project ensures the aqueduct will continue to stand as a reminder of our State’s remarkable history and engineering achievements, for both New Yorkers and visitors alike to experience.”

The Erie Canal Aqueduct at Schoharie Crossing is a popular destination for history buffs and outdoor enthusiasts alike. The site will resume normal operations at the boat launch and picnic area upon completion of the project in 2023. Updates on the status of the project can be found on the State Parks website or Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site social media.