How much states and counties get from $350B COVID relief program

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FILE – In this Feb. 24, 2021, file photo, President Joe Biden pauses after signing an executive order relating to U.S. supply chains, in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. Biden is preparing to sign an executive order to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour for federal contractors. Administration officials say it will provide a pay bump to hundreds of thousands. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

WASHINGTON (KTVX) — Details on President Joe Biden’s gigantic $1.9 trillion COVID-19 pandemic rescue plan have been released by the White House, giving an idea of where more than $350 billion in state and local fiscal recovery funds is heading.

NEWS10 has a breakdown of where the funds go, by state, county, and even by city.

On a national scale, California led the way with a total funding amount of over $27 billion, followed by Texas with over $15 billion and New York with $12 billion:

StateAllocation
Alabama$356,382,822 
Alaska$43,189,176 
Arizona$226,731,767 
Arkansas$216,225,138 
California$1,218,261,277 
Colorado$265,396,436 
Connecticut$202,744,874 
Delaware$90,583,517 
District of Columbia$0 
Florida$1,416,425,123 
Georgia$861,827,586 
Hawaii$46,191,175 
Idaho$107,940,808 
Illinois$742,179,391 
Indiana$432,551,280 
Iowa$221,737,821 
Kansas$167,352,563 
Kentucky$324,203,207 
Louisiana$315,493,318 
Maine$119,223,764 
Maryland$528,963,161 
Massachusetts$385,056,772 
Michigan$644,291,475 
Minnesota$376,932,399 
Mississippi$268,046,958 
Missouri$450,143,657 
Montana$86,377,829 
Nebraska$111,189,720 
Nevada$150,738,524 
New Hampshire$112,208,773 
New Jersey$578,121,375 
New Mexico$126,089,079 
New York$774,248,894 
North Carolina$705,384,207 
North Dakota$53,174,975 
Ohio$843,726,939 
Oklahoma$238,432,979 
Oregon$248,351,580 
Pennsylvania$983,008,128 
Rhode Island$58,146,731 
South Carolina$435,125,080 
South Dakota$65,246,504 
Tennessee$438,055,590 
Texas$1,386,117,819 
Utah$186,820,600 
Vermont$58,788,245 
Virginia$633,753,549 
Washington$442,823,871 
West Virginia$162,490,814 
Wisconsin$411,577,691 
Wyoming$47,790,929 
American Samoa$5,071,819 
Guam$17,599,913 
Norther Mariana Islands$5,447,789 
Puerto Rico$124,849,699 
Virgin Islands$11,164,890 
Total$19,530,000,000

Check out county-by-county breakdowns for New York, Vermont, and Massachusetts:

StateCountyAmount
MassachusettsBarnstable$41,370,811 
MassachusettsBerkshire$24,268,907 
MassachusettsBristol$109,786,776 
MassachusettsDukes$3,366,538 
MassachusettsEssex$153,260,605 
MassachusettsFranklin$13,631,642 
MassachusettsHampden$90,587,294 
MassachusettsHampshire$31,239,342 
MassachusettsMiddlesex$313,053,637 
MassachusettsNantucket$2,214,122 
MassachusettsNorfolk$137,282,758 
MassachusettsPlymouth$101,237,378 
MassachusettsSuffolk$156,149,511 
MassachusettsWorcester$161,338,586 
New YorkAlbany$59,340,959 
New YorkAllegany$8,952,636 
New YorkBronx$275,470,084 
New YorkBroome$37,000,061 
New YorkCattaraugus$14,784,835 
New YorkCayuga$14,873,990 
New YorkChautauqua$24,649,420 
New YorkChemung$16,210,350 
New YorkChenango$9,169,406 
New YorkClinton$15,633,268 
New YorkColumbia$11,549,602 
New YorkCortland$9,242,051 
New YorkDelaware$8,572,706 
New YorkDutchess$57,148,397 
New YorkErie$178,447,094 
New YorkEssex$7,164,479 
New YorkFranklin$9,716,187 
New YorkFulton$10,369,022 
New YorkGenesee$11,125,969 
New YorkGreene$9,165,716 
New YorkHamilton$857,756 
New YorkHerkimer$11,910,497 
New YorkJefferson$21,333,967 
New YorkKings$497,231,149 
New YorkLewis$5,107,690 
New YorkLivingston$12,220,307 
New YorkMadison$13,779,458 
New YorkManhattan$316,357,047 
New YorkMonroe$144,080,127 
New YorkMontgomery$9,560,602 
New YorkNassau$385,003,440 
New YorkNiagara$40,650,381 
New YorkOneida$44,416,661 
New YorkOnondaga$89,452,165 
New YorkOntario$21,322,895 
New YorkOrange$74,770,082 
New YorkOrleans$7,837,903 
New YorkOswego$22,749,964 
New YorkOtsego$11,555,818 
New YorkPutnam$19,097,507 
New YorkQueens$437,785,496 
New YorkRensselaer$30,828,334 
New YorkRichmond$92,485,196 
New YorkRockland$63,280,694 
New YorkSaratoga$44,648,193 
New YorkSchenectady$30,165,010 
New YorkSchoharie$6,021,192 
New YorkSchuyler$3,458,801 
New YorkSeneca$6,607,209 
New YorkSt. Lawrence$20,927,232 
New YorkSteuben$18,526,253 
New YorkSuffolk$286,812,434 
New YorkSullivan$14,651,782 
New YorkTioga$9,362,868 
New YorkTompkins$19,847,267 
New YorkUlster$34,491,474 
New YorkWarren$12,420,372 
New YorkWashington$11,888,160 
New YorkWayne$17,465,517 
New YorkWestchester$187,926,698 
New YorkWyoming$7,742,143 
New YorkYates$4,839,058 
VermontAddison$7,143,501 
VermontBennington$6,889,632 
VermontCaledonia$5,825,789 
VermontChittenden$31,811,180 
VermontEssex$1,197,091 
VermontFranklin$9,595,759 
VermontGrand Isle$1,405,314 
VermontLamoille$4,926,271 
VermontOrange$5,611,932 
VermontOrleans$5,251,620 
VermontRutland$11,302,920 
VermontWashington$11,345,264 
VermontWindham$8,201,129 
VermontWindsor$10,695,148 

Here is a breakdown of allotments to some major local cities:

Albany$80,725,433
Colonie (town)$9,482,071
Glen Falls$12,008,323
Kingston$17,301,385
Saratoga Springs$7,848,020
Schenectady$52,971,798
Troy$42,879,140
Pittsfield, Massachusetts$32,417,190

Administration officials said payments could begin to go out in the coming days to eligible governments, allowing state, local, territorial and tribal officials to offset the economic damage from the coronavirus pandemic.

Guidance from the Treasury Department listed broad categories for spending the money. State and local governments can use the money for public health expenses. They can also offset harm from the downturn to workers, small businesses, and affected industries. Money can replace lost public sector revenues. Essential workers can qualify for premium pay, and investments can be made in water, sewer, and broadband internet.

But Treasury has also placed restrictions. Officials said the funds should not be used by state and local governments to cut taxes, pay down debt or bolster reserve funds.

“Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds provide eligible state, local, territorial, and Tribal governments with a substantial infusion of resources to meet pandemic response needs and rebuild a stronger, more equitable economy as the country recovers,” the White House says in a fact sheet. “Within the categories of eligible uses, recipients have broad flexibility to decide how best to use this funding to meet the needs of their communities.”

There are some stipulations, however. Treasure officials said the funds should not be used by state and local governments to cut taxes, pay down debt or bolster reserve funds.

Biden defended this proposed plan by calling it the first step in large-scale economic recovery.

“Some critics said we didn’t need the American Rescue Plan — that this economy would just heal itself,” Biden says. “Today’s report just underscores, in my view, how vital the actions we’re taking are…we’re still digging out of an economic collapse.”

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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