(NEXSTAR) – Paul Herman, a prolific actor who appeared in “The Sopranos” and “The Irishman,” has passed away, his management company confirmed. Herman died Tuesday, which was also his 76th birthday

“He will be deeply missed by all who knew him, and we will always remember the sound of his laughter and bold spirit,” a representative for his talent agency said in a statement shared with Entertainment Weekly. “We ask that you respect the privacy of the family at this time.”

The actor, who has over 60 credits to his name on IMDb, had appeared in multiple films directed by Martin Scorsese, with small parts in “Goodfellas,” “Casino,” and a turn as a mobster in “The Irishman.” Herman also appeared in three of David O. Russell’s films — “Silver Linings Playbook,” “American Hustle” and “Joy” — between 2012 and 2015.

He, along with his costars in “American Hustle,” earned a Screen Actors Guild award in 2014.  

“American Hustle” director David O. Russell, actress Jennifer Lawrence, actor Paul Herman and actor Alessandro Nivola are pictured together at the 20th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards in 2014. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images)

TV fans, meanwhile, might best remember Herman for his recurring role on HBO’s “The Sopranos” as Peter “Beansie” Gaeta, a pizzeria owner and former mobster who maintained a friendship with Tony Soprano amid tensions with incarcerated mob boss Richie Aprile. He also had a recurring role on HBO’s “Entourage” as an accountant.

“Paulie was just a great dude,” wrote “Sopranos” actor Michael Imperioli of his former co-star in an Instagram post on Wednesday morning. “A first-class storyteller and raconteur and one hell of an actor.”

Lorraine Bracco, who also appeared in “The Sopranos” and “Goodfellas,” called Herman a “loving soul with a great sense of humor” on Twitter. “Rest in peace,” she added.

Other friends, including Tony Danza, Debi Mazar, and “Entourage” producer Doug Ellin, shared their own tributes on social media. “Paulie was generous, caring, and hilarious. And too young to be gone,” Ellin wrote.